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Art Archives - d.trio marketing group

Analyzing art

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I recently painted a self-portrait and posted it to social media with the question, “Am I done?” I did this because, with the subject matter so close, I wasn’t sure I could see it objectively. There were an interesting array of responses but the one that intrigued me was from my friend and fellow artist, Jerome. He asked, “Do you think you’re done?” Which begs the question, in creative pursuits, why do you have to live with what is done in order to improve the results? And how do you know when to stop?

In creative development it’s important to have the time and the space to take a step back in the process and let objectivity settle in. This will make good creative great by revealing things that are not immediately obvious, things that it takes our brains some time to process. The reasons for this are based in the way we perceive and process information, as well as our interactions with the world – stored as past experiences. And the more experience you have with something, the more your gut instincts come into play.

There were times in my process where I thought I’d gotten something perfect, and the next time I saw my painting I’d see the proportions were off or the color was slightly wrong. What I was in love with yesterday (the masterpiece syndrome, my Carleton professor called it) today was sub-par. With time, small iterations, feedback and a little objectivity I finished my self-portrait, and I’m pleased with the results. If I had rushed through it, it may have been fine, but not the best it could be.

Designers have it harder than ever because the perception is, if the tools are easier to use, design must be easier than it used to be. The tools may help the technician be more accurate but they don’t drive the creative process, they facilitate it. We still need the talent, the gut instinct, objectivity and time to do our best work. Next time you have a creative project, give it a little extra time to develop and see for yourself.

Please let us know what you think, here or on Facebook and for more information on how the brain processes visual information click here:

http://piktochart.com/5-psychology-studies-that-tell-us-how-people-perceive-visual-information/

From Fresh to Outrageous

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Our word for the month of May is Outrageous and I have to say, we’re all pretty excited about this word and have some fun ideas lined up to represent it. Last month our word was Fresh as we were thinking April…Spring…Fresh…right? However, April brought more snow than showers but with a few adjustments, freshness prevailed. As we now transition from Fresh to Outrageous the recent show at the Minnesota Art Institute comes immediately to mind. Art In Bloom is a yearly event which just recently celebrated it’s 30th year at the institute. At Art In Bloom, local artists and florists re-create the essence of artistic masterpieces using flowers in a most Outrageous way. If you’ve not been, you’re missing out on some serious artistic inspiration, not to mention amazing scents.

For some photos of this years winners, check out the Art Institute page:
http://www.artsmia.org/art-in-bloom-2013

 

-Maureen Dyvig is one of the founding partners of d.trio marketing group

The Field

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In varius varius justo, eget ultrices mauris rhoncus non. Morbi tristique, mauris eu imperdiet bibendum, velit diam iaculis velit, in ornare massa enim at lorem. Etiam risus diam, porttitor vitae ultrices quis, dapibus id dolor. Morbi venenatis lacinia rhoncus. Read More

Social Media Saved Me From the Back to School Madness

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It used to be a simple list: #2 pencils, Crayola markers and a pencil box. Now, the list continues, with more and more supplies that schools used to purchase. Dry erase markers, Kleenex, and anti biotic wipes? As a parent, I’m afraid to look at school supply receipts; did you know the average spend for school supplies with K-12 students is now $688? Yikes.

Last year I made a promise to never again wait until the last minute to shop for back to school supplies. The 2011 nightmare started with one naïve mother of a 1st grader who had a crazy idea that school shopping would be fun. The story ended with frustration…plus, a blue “Friday Folder” instead of black one and off-brand markers instead of the requested 12-pack of Crayolas.

Fast forward to early summer, 2012. Social media saved me from back to school insanity. The discount stores and my friends started posting on Facebook that school supplies already hit the store shelves. Not wanting to be the last minute shopper this year, I decided it would be a great task for my husband and kids to do together! He came home sweating, surprised by the cost…and all of the supplies crossed off the list.

Back to school online purchases this year included a backpack and a pair of running pants. I’m not alone — a whopping 39.6% of back to school purchases are made online now, up dramatically from 10.9% in 2003.

I have a few online lessons for next year though. The backpack purchase was last minute – it had to be a one-strap backpack with neon colors. The outrageous shipping almost doubled the price. As for the running pants, I thought they came with a jacket. Oops. Online purchases are not without a few hiccups, right?

Did I buy enough new clothes for my child? Are 12 glue sticks going to last him the year? Will he think his backpack is still “cool” in April? And speaking of cool, will he be warm enough without a matching jacket to his running pants?

School has started, and my son made it through his first day. The back to school madness is over and, thanks to social media, was much less painful this year. Hello, holiday season. I trust social media will also let me know when I should start my present shopping!

P.S. Do you know of a school or teacher that could use $100 worth of art supplies? d.trio loves to support the arts, including budding artists. We are giving $100 in art supplies this month! Tell us about a worthy school or teacher on our Facebook page, facebook.com/dtrio or use hashtag #dtriolovesart on Twitter this month, and they could win $100 in supplies!

Sources:
http://blog.nrf.com/2012/07/26/bts-trends-2012/

The Art of Business

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In honor of Creative Summer, one of our awesome clients has written a guest blog about how her art has made her better at business.

by Renée Vevea

It’s always a bit difficult for me to answer the question, “What do you do?”. A common question oftentimes asked by people just met or haven’t seen for a while. My answer is not a simple statement or a one-liner. I’ve come to fear, in my own way, answering this question because I’m not sure where to edit myself. It would be easy to say I’m a teacher, a banker, a marketer, a salesperson, a stay-at-home mom, a student. But my answer goes something like this:

“I work full-time as a digital senior business project manager for a large corporation downtown Minneapolis, am a part-time adjunct faculty (teaching two times a week) at a local college, am working on my doctorate and am also an artist specializing in acrylic painting and have an art studio in St. Paul. And, by the way, I’m a mother to a college senior, am preparing for my third solo art show this year, and spend lots of time in the social media arena – Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and blogging – under various nomenclatures. “

Eyes start to glaze over midway through my description and heads start to shake.

But I don’t think I’m alone in not having a one-line answer to the question “what do you do”. In our current culture of digitization we have at our realm smart phones, wireless tablets, GPS navigation systems, and everything in between. We are becoming a culture of multi-taskers whether we like it or not. We can order our groceries, make doctor’s appointments, pay our bills and send a birthday card all online. Instead of sitting on the couch and watching television for four hours a night, we can sit on the couch, watch television, pay our bills, send emails to friends and family, connect thru social media, take college classes, check our work email and write our grocery list. Some say technology has improved and streamlined our lives; others state it has isolated us.

I’ve always been both analytical and creative, using the left and right sides of my brain. Finding a career that both challenges and satisfies both sides has in itself been challenging. Always easier to find jobs that were more analytical, the creative side started to atrophy a few years ago and I felt like I was losing part of myself. After trying jewelry making, knitting, quilting and card making, I took a painting class. It lasted 6 weeks. The first night I was so afraid – I had never held a paintbrush in my hand nor made a color wheel. Blue and yellow make green….red and blue make purple….how glorious it felt to blend and swirl the paintbrush with the wet acrylic paint into a variety of sumptuous colors. The first stroke of wet paint on the canvas made me feel uplifted, airy and light. I wasn’t nervous anymore. I took the class six more times and began to introduce myself at each first session as the student the teacher wouldn’t pass – it was a joke – but I couldn’t get enough of painting and the classroom gave me the three hours a week to be free. Free from thinking about work, about deadlines, about schedules, about to do lists.

Nuages Pleurer, acrylic with multiple compounds, 2011

Nuages Pleurer, acrylic with multiple compounds, 2011

Finally, after the sixth time taking the class, my teacher, a wonderful woman with two MFAs, took me aside and said I should go it alone – she could teach me no more. I had started using many multiple compounds with the paint and my paintings, very abstract and textural, took on a style all of their own. Fortunately, I found an artist’s cooperative in St. Paul who, after an interview and viewing of my work, accepted me into the co-op. My art has flourished and is ever-changing – with the seasons, with where I am emotionally and spiritually, and with the different and myriad inspirations that come my way. My first solo art show was this past January – over 40 pieces. I was very excited to have the opportunity to show my work – and only my work – in one location for three months but also apprehensive and a bit anxious feeling vulnerable about my paintings. What if people didn’t like it…what if no one came to the opening (fortunately over 200 people did come to the opening!).

Naptime, acrylic, 2012

Naptime, acrylic, 2012

Art is art. It has its own subjectivity which cannot be controlled, nor edited. I paint what I like to paint. When I paint I’m in a place like no other – my mind is free and I feel the most creative. The time I take to paint – usually 4-6 hours per week is very important to me and I have realized, thru the practice, exercise and commitment to painting, I have grown in my career. Painting has taught me to be more patient, to not be so hard on myself, and also, if I don’t like something, I can do it over. It’s okay to show someone your art – or at work to share with your co-workers your successes – it’s okay to be vulnerable, it’s okay to open up. Rejection is something we put on ourselves.

I still don’t have a short answer to the question, “what do you do”, but am happy to share all that I do and have realized that sharing the part of my life, art, that is so important, has not only filled the creative side of my personality but also allowed that side to show at work and through some of the projects I work on. Art and creativity are everywhere…including the business world.

bulles d’air, acrylic with multiple compounds, 2011

bulles d’air, acrylic with multiple compounds, 2011

Renée Vevea lives in the Twin Cities and works in the interactive field. Renee is also an adjunct faculty at the Art Institute International. A member of the Old Town Artist’s Co-op in St. Paul, Renée has been painting for over three years and is busily preparing for her third solo art show this October. She is excited to have her son graduate from college in December so she’ll have more funds to purchase painting supplies.

Principles of Improv

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Note: As part of our Art Month theme, some of us are sharing the creative pursuits that enrich our lives, both at work and outside of it.

by Jordan Bainer

If you look hard enough, you start to see connections between various components of your life. For me, improv comedy is a hobby that strangely blends into my work life interactions. Many times in my career, I’ve utilized improv rules to simplify and improve my work. I’ve identified a few improv comedy concepts below and explained how they link to life in the agency world.

  1. “Yes, and…”: A cardinal rule of improv is “yes, and…”, meaning that if someone says something, their partner on stage should accept it and build upon it. Denial or minimizing something your partner gives you quickly halts any progress in the scene and stifles creativity. For example, if I tell you “we’re in a helicopter” and you respond with “no we’re not, we’re in a canyon”, sounds like a weak story, right?This improv rule applies nicely to brainstorming. A common trap in agency and client brainstorming sessions is to rule out or filter ideas as the group comes up with them. During these times of free idea sharing, we have to remove all filters. All ideas are accepted until the brainstorm is over and the group is narrowing down ideas. Those ideas that are thrown out early on could have sparked other ideas that eventually become the winning concept. In brainstorming, the rule “yes, and…” supports and builds on creative suggestions.
  2. Tagouts, swipes, edits: In a slight contrast to “yes, and…” are tagouts, swipes, and edits. “Yes, and…” teaches you how to accept and move forward a partner’s agenda. Transition tools like tagouts, swipes, and edits cut a scene and move on to another scene or time period. Since it’s important to end scenes on a high note, players on the back-line need to listen to the audience and move the story along where appropriate.During client presentations, a common practice is to review each concept in a linear fashion until all material been exhausted. The client can then “react” to those ideas presented at the conclusion. Unfortunately, this presentation strategy doesn’t allow for open discussion, which could potentially save an idea if there is any client skepticism or misunderstanding. Those involved in client presentations need to be cognizant of what’s happening in the audience and ready to jump in when ideas or concepts can be explored further. Editing or tagging out your presentation partner isn’t bad manners as long as you are building on the larger story and ending on a high note.
  3. Finding the Theme: For many long-form improv performances, the group is looking for an overarching idea or theme to link disparate scenes together to create an overarching narrative or story. Themes can be decided upon by the audience or formulated throughout the course of the improv performance.Themes are crucial for organizing complex ideas or recommendations for integrated campaigns. Taking a step back and identifying the theme will make it easier showcase work and link back to a larger strategy. Clearly stating themes and concepts early on demonstrates your knowledge of the client’s brand.

Once you start to think about general concepts behind different experiences or interests, it’s amazing how everything begins to blur into one another. That’s why I’ve made it a priority to try new artistic endeavors to fuel those links and continually learn.

It’s Art Month!

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We’ve declared it Art Month here at d.trio. A time to make some, see some, be some art. We’ll be featuring some guest bloggers during this month as well as exploring the creative side of some of our team. Like Jordan said, “I forget how interesting we all are.” We think it’s time to remember how we all exercise our creativity outside of our everyday jobs of putting creativity to work for marketing purposes.

So, during July, look for a guest post from one of our writers who is also a wonderful wildlife photographer, thoughts from one of our AE’s who is into improv, musings from local art fairs and maybe even updates on a sculpture in progress in the back hallway. We also invite you to check out our newest Pinterest board called 30 Days of Design where we’ll be featuring inspiring or beautiful or interesting design that may be better labeled as art as well as exploring creativity in general.

Do you have a creative pursuit that keeps you energized or up at night or fulfilled? Let us know on Facebook or in the comments here. We’d love to see your work!