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outrageous Archives - d.trio marketing group

Product placement – outrageous or not?

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Overall, do product placements in media add or subtract from the experience?

Product placements promote the brands willing to pay for the screen time and also create a more “realistic” cinematic experience. We’re bombarded with messaging in our normal lives; it’s logical that movie and television characters would also be exposed to this constant stream of messaging as well.

Product placement truly becomes problematic when it’s blatantly obvious that the product is not adding anything to the narrative or story. Here are a few outrageous examples of product placements:

  • Samsung Galaxy Phone during Shark Tank
  • Anything on the Biggest Loser
  • Oracle Servers throughout Iron Man 3
  • FedEx throughout Cast Away

Do you feel product placements add or subtract from the experience? Is it worth it, overall, for brands to feature their products in narrative stories?

 

-Jordan Bainer is a senior account executive at d.trio marketing group

Outrageous Marketing That Paid Off

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Sometimes, marketing campaigns break the rules and go against conventional knowledge in order to make a point or build awareness. Since this month’s theme is all about “outrageous ideas”, what better way to celebrate that theme by talking about risky marketing tactics that paid off?

Doritos Crowdsources It’s Advertising
Back in 2007, social media was become more and more pervasive in peoples’ lives. Doritos decided to hand over control of their Super Bowl TV ad creative to consumers who submitted 30-second spots. Doritos asked the world to rate those submitted ideas and then aired the winning entry.

Why Risky?
Super Bowl ad space runs between $3 and $4 million for a 30 second spot. Turning over creative control to consumers could have been a very costly social experiment.

Why Successful?
Doritos has developed a niche for itself in future Super Bowl ads and has since continued to tap into their consumers for funny, engaging TV spots.
http://adage.com/article/cmo-strategy/liodice-ten-big-marketing-risks-paid-brands/143873/

Dominos Says “We Stink”
In 2010, Dominos came out with a campaign telling the world that the old Dominos was dead and gone and there was a new Dominos in town. Instead of focusing only on the good, they admitted their past faults in specific ways, calling their old pizza crust “cardboard” and pizza sauce “ketchup”.

Why Risky?
You risk alienating your brand advocates by calling your past product faulty and you may dissuade future customers from trying your product.

Why Successful?
Sales soared nearly 15% after the new recipes debuted and the campaign started. Many people commended Dominos for their honesty and forthcoming communications.
http://newsblogs.chicagotribune.com/burns-on-business/2010/05/dominos-we-stink-strategy-pays-off.html

What outrageous, risky campaigns do you think paid off for the marketer?

 

-Jordan Bainer is a senior account executive at d.trio marketing group

From Fresh to Outrageous

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Our word for the month of May is Outrageous and I have to say, we’re all pretty excited about this word and have some fun ideas lined up to represent it. Last month our word was Fresh as we were thinking April…Spring…Fresh…right? However, April brought more snow than showers but with a few adjustments, freshness prevailed. As we now transition from Fresh to Outrageous the recent show at the Minnesota Art Institute comes immediately to mind. Art In Bloom is a yearly event which just recently celebrated it’s 30th year at the institute. At Art In Bloom, local artists and florists re-create the essence of artistic masterpieces using flowers in a most Outrageous way. If you’ve not been, you’re missing out on some serious artistic inspiration, not to mention amazing scents.

For some photos of this years winners, check out the Art Institute page:
http://www.artsmia.org/art-in-bloom-2013

 

-Maureen Dyvig is one of the founding partners of d.trio marketing group